Bionicle Gen 1 Ebooks?

Is it possible for the Gen 1 books to be available in ebook format? I love your work, but I’ve reread them so many times that they’re fraying a bit, and I want to make sure that I can continue to read them for years to come!

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Back when the books were coming out, Scholastic indicated to me that they were not planning to do ebooks or audiobooks because that wasn’t how kids read at that time.

As far as what is going on now – I didn’t read what you wrote, because technically it is a copyright violation, so fortunately something obscured my vision when I got to the post about something happening now.

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So no official ebooks for Gen 1 anytime soon then.

See, you’d think that the copyright violation that no one cares about would be enough reason for Scholastic to consider it, if only because it would be incrediby easy. Ah well.

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Scholastic no longer has a license that covers G1, Azani, because nothing has been published for G1 since 2009-2010. So they couldn’t do this if they wanted to – they can’t sell something BIONICLE-related without a license from LEGO Group.

And while it is easy to dismiss the copyright violation, if someday you write books and maybe are in a position to get royalties (which I was not on BIONICLE), you would very much care about someone reprinting your work without permission. That’s why you don’t see unauthorized Stephen King ebooks on the web :slight_smile:

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Ah, alrighty. In retrospect, it makes sense that Scholastic would no longer posess that license in any capacity.

And for the record, I do want to mention that I meant no disrespect with my comment on the copyright violation. I am typically very keen on respecting the copyright of others, but my thoughts on the Bionicle books included the fact that they are no longer published, pertaining to a dead license, very unpopular, and, as you said, not tied to royalties for any individuals who are content creators. I hope that I seem a little less insensitive now. :slight_smile:

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Keep in mind that copyright law is not tied to whether something is still in print, still “popular,” a “dead license,” or whatever. A work for hire, as the BIONICLE books were, is copyrighted for 90 years from the time of publication. So while the license not being active does reduce the risk of there being an issue, a zealous legal department may still shoot out a cease and desist letter.

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No, and that’s a very good reminder. Again, I do try to be pretty exact with this sort of thing, and it’s wise to gauge the situation in a conservative manner. Thank you for that.

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