How to explain the Bionicle to a newbie?

Hello,

So I have a friend that has never really gotten into Bionicle back in the day. Now he’s certainly seen them in stores and thought they were nifty things, but I think to him they were just “designs” and not really part of a larger expansive story.

Anyways, we’ve been thinking about doing a podcast or video series where we each pick a franchise unknown to the other and try to explain to one another the lore, history, and interesting facts regarding it. And of course, I want to explain Bionicle since I know he’ll be very intrigued by the series… assuming I explain it right that is.

So I am here to ask how exactly to I jump into explaining Bionicle? Do I explain first how the series was conceived? Do I explain the general culture of this world?

If anyone has any idea how to approach this to someone new please let me know, it would really help me out. Thanks!

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For a total newbie, I think the comics are an easy introduction to the story. They can all be found here.

I also think a brief summary of how the franchise was conceived would be a good idea.

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Idk how to help you with your problem, but,

^ this is a great idea for a show.

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Thanks, I’m glad to hear that it’s something people would be interested in.

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If I was going to explain Bionicle to someone who had no prior experience with it, I would start with the basics without going into too much detail.

For example the 6 elements, the hierarchy of characters (Toa, Matoran, Turaga), the Island Mata Nui, Makuta, and the story from there out. You could expand a lot more and get into the other years, but I think the first years of Bionicle are a good starting point for new people.

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I was actually thinking of the basics in this manner, my only worry with this is how to get my friend on the same page. Things can easily go over his head if I’m not too careful haha.

here’s how I would explain it:

*The setting is a foreign world (worlds, as of '09) filled with alien species that are all partially mechanical, but not completely
*Most species has some sort of unique power, the most common being various elemental powers or the ability to wear masks that give them niche powers
*The most notable species are the Matoran, who are small and generally powerless but certain members of which are predestined to become Toa, which are taller and have the elemental and mask powers
*even though it is an technologically advanced universe, each individual has a predetermined destiny, and the universe is run by a singular god, but who doesn’t care that much about its inhabitants, but will be hurt if its inhabitants do not live in certain harmony.
*That god just got put to sleep by Teridax, the leader of a powerful species known as Makuta. In order to awake him, the Toa must travel to a faraway place to perform a ritual, but must first protect the Matoran of Mata Nui from the Makuta’s underlings until they can overtake their base, which links them to the rest of the world

that should put into motion some of the mechanics of the universe and the main conflict. You could dig slightly deeper into a few recurring elements, such as protodermis/antidermis, organizations like the Dark Hunters and the Order of Mata Nui, the separate world of the Glatorian and the Three Virtues. You’ll note that I try to explain the story in a way that hides the Big Story Engine (the nature of Mata Nui) and also gives an overall direction to the Golden Years, which at least to me as a latecomer seems to have no clear direction.

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Do not explain the “world inside robot” thing. This will be a surprise. From all things I think that it is important to explain that they are not robots, but biomechanical creatures. Watching movies first is a great idea.

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The most important, I believe, is to make clear that they are not robots. Movies would be a good start.

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