Looking for some advice

Hey folks, thought I post this as I need some advice about something. I want to make reviews of my MOCs and sets I own, but every single time I turn on the recording I literally can't say a word, no matter how I try and I'm not even on the recording visually. Can anyone give any good advice how to defeat this weird thing that's limiting me?

Thank you.

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try making a script, it might help if you can't think of what to say.

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It's not that I can't think of anything to say, it's literally my voice refusing to leave my mouth, like some weird stage fright.

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then try practicing without the camera, get comfortable with the script or with whatever you're saying, then record it.

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I'll do my best, I did bookmark a video that can help how to write the review script in the structural sense.

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Maybe take an improv class or something? Talk more to other people so you're more natural in the way you speak.

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I know that feel. :smile: Like i'd start out with "hey, Rockho here" then I'd just freeze mid-way through thinking about how weird my voice sounds...a script definitely helps, and don't worry if you stumble over your words. You can always stop and then try again (that's what audio editing is for :stuck_out_tongue:)

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Scripts are always the best. I also have trouble with that.

Here's my tips:

  1. Scripts are usually a good way to go. You can have a clear direction of where to go and you won't sound like you are fumbling for words.

  2. If you can't say what you've written, try going into a closet or a bathroom. I find it helps me to feel less like I'm being watched and I can just talk.

  3. Don't act like you're talking to an audience. I find it helps to flat out just read what you've written as if you're talking to yourself and not directly to other people.

  4. If you're doing say, a MOC review in a similar manner to Shadowgear where you literally just sit there and improv talk, then just try to keep yourself talking. Say anything, you can always cut it out later.

Hope it helps!

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This right here, is probably the best advice out there. When it comes to stage fright, I used to have it, but one really embarrassing moment led me to get rid of it almost instantaneously, so I don't really know how to get rid of it lol

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It is important to master the brew and not let it master you. Oh, and to drink a lot of water. That is also important. Sorry, I never had stage fright, but I can relate. I always relax, try a bit of a silly face in the mirror, and then get on with it like nothing is wrong, and I am talking to a big audience who is appreciative and will have the context I need them to have.