Productivity Experiment uses Bionicle Figures

The following is a portion copied and pasted from this link

http://www.techinsider.io/my-week-of-internet-traffic-withdrawal-2015-11

The difference between someone doing the bare minimum and them going the extra mile comes down to a key aspect of human psychology, which craves recognition and feedback. Without it, all hope of productivity is lost.

Dan Ariely, a behavioral economist at Duke University, has seen this firsthand when college students play with toys.

In 2008, Ariely designed a set of experiments in which groups of Duke students were paid a small and continually declining amount of money for each Bionicle action figure they put together. In one version of the experiment, the researchers put each completed Bionicle on the desk beside the previous one, letting the group see how much progress they'd made. In the other version, the Bionicle was immediately taken apart and given back to group members.

Ariely's team found a stark difference in each group's productivity levels. The first group put together an average of 11 Bionicles, earning them $14.40. The other group, meanwhile, put together just 7 Bionicles, earning $11.52.

For Ariely, this was a keyhole insight into productivity. He reasoned that when people can bask in the fruits of their labor, they are more likely to work hard. If someone spends time on a project, even if it's 10 minutes putting together a toy, they'll feel more motivated if they can enjoy the final product.

Timestamped video further detailing experiment

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He's calling BIONICLE figures robots.

THIS IS NOT MEANINGFUL TO SCIENCE ARRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRGH

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You should see this (timestamped) vid, he calls 'em Legos :grin:

Also, that poor Gahlok

Highlight of the article:

Bionicles.

Under a picture of '03 and stars Takanuva

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Eternally screams

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my ocd. it hurts.

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To play devil's advocate, that's a common misconception. Also, he's using BIONICLE to illustrate something to an audience with no understanding of of it. It's easier to call them robots than "biomechanical lifeforms."

Yeah, he got a lot of things wrong, both with LEGO terminology and somehow assembled gahlok backwards, but that's not the point of this video. He's using BIONICLE sets as an experiment. He's not actually talking about BIONICLE itself.

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these experiments are really interesting schools should take notes from this!

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